This solo exhibition by Kevin Malcolm presents works from an ongoing artistic research project initiated in 2014. Its starting point is the Musée Guimet in Paris and the collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Émile Étienne Guimet whose fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

 

Driven by an interest in how images, texts and objects communicate meaning, Malcolm uses alteration, recombination and repositioning to highlight residual histories and power dynamics.


The Encounter of Bodies is a show alongside a published fictive script by Stine Marie Jacobsen written in reference to the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, where a main character pretends to be mentally ill and lets himself be admitted to a mental hospital. Upon arriving, the character finds the ward run by a strict nurse, who instead of helping the patients in their recovery actually suppresses their mental health.

 

 

Similarly, in this script, the artworks of the show are in group therapy sessions led by the strict curators of Woodpecker Projects. We follow their discussions and self-explanations in a “behind the scene” set at Ystad Art Museum. In this show we are testing and unfolding ideas of power relations and hierarchical positions using body and language within and between the artworks.

 

 

Oftentimes we see artworks curbed to fit into curators’ manifests – precisely like patients in a ward run by a strict nurse who ignores details and sensitivities. We are testing the idea of the art show in relation to hierarchy, branding and the quest for curator fame. Still, under this mask we still believe society is crazy and that art is the voice of sanity!


This show by Kevin Malcolm takes its starting point at the Musée Guimet in Paris and it’s collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Emile Guimet. His fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

Not only describing the colour, Outremer (Ultramarine) translates directly from French as overseas and was the name given to colonial territories and to military service performed there.

 

In these works the role of the artist as collector and exhibitor of images and objects in a digital era is questioned and parallels are made with 19th Century traditions of collecting.


The represented artists in the exhibition TERRA INCOGNITA at KRETS, work with different concepts and materials. Some works are documenting, some are romanticizing and others deceive the viewer’s eye. Some materials are refined and others raw.

 

The works are results of different processes, somehow dealing with nature. Some use the idea of nature, exploring it in contrast to a civilized, cultured world. Others are more direct confrontations. With these works, we hope to share and explore questions dealing with our (the contemporary human’s) relation to nature and its expressions.

 

TERRA INCOGNITA, the title of our book and of the exhibition, is a term used in cartography for regions that have not yet been mapped or documented. It is also the title of Jens Henricson’s contribution to the exhibition, which depicts a kidney cancer cell magnified 180 times. The artwork is reminiscent of how similar the microscopic sometimes is to the macroscopic. Henricson’s work is also the cover of our book.


AND AGAIN SHIFTS / OCH IGEN SKIFTEN is an exhibition and a part of Sandström’s research project Howe Across Reading – Performing the Past - an artistic research project, within the field of literary composition.

 

It is an investigation into the histories and languages of New England in the north east of USA and Västerbotten in the north of Sweden, with and through 
the writings of poet and literary scholar Susan Howe.

 

The project looks at, and listens to, how sounds, times and spaces are generated in ongoing translation
and trans-historical reading and writing across geographies, religions, and literatures. Howe’s texts are here a condition for searching, a means to navigate within archives, narratives, language based time-space.


In light of the current situation where an increasingly heated political climate is shaping the rhetoric and discussion concerning migrants and refugees – we wish to investigate the agency of art and artists working with these matters or within related fields.

 

The symposium is organized by Woodpecker Projects and artist Maj Hasager in collaboration with IAC, Malmö and Malmö Konstmuseum.


Swedish premiere of the film We will meet in the blind spot by Maj Hasager (DK), and launch of her publication Making Visible published by Woodpecker Projects.

 

Release of Bifurcating futures, performance with dancer Maria Concetta Borgese (IT) and vinyl record release of Bifurcating Soundscape by composer Ask Kæreby (DK).

 

 


We Hate In Order to Survive is an exhibition that, on the one hand, shows the nature of hatred; it’s emotions, it’s propaganda and its logic. On the other hand, tries to understand the underlying reasons for it. Wherein lies the fascination of a homogeneous nation; the need to abolish the pluralistic society?

 

Is it possible to explain exclusion and hostility, and how it arises, from an artistic perspective? And secondly, is it possible to reach a plan of action and actually change the world through art? How do artists think and work with these questions?

 

(Artworks above by Runo Lagomarsino and Viktor Rosdahl)


With Furåker’s exhibition A Poet in Need of an Empire at Ping Pong Gallery, Malmö, as a starting point, we invited Maj Hasager, Oscar K, Henrik Arnstad and the exhibiting artist Johan Furåker to write a letter each to someone from someone relating to the overall thematics. Also, we are publishing two essays by Lisbeth Bonde and Göran Hägg, respectively, who are presenting Gabriele D’Annunzio in closer detail.


The poet is a faker

Who’s so good at his act

He even fakes the pain

Of pain he feels in fact

 

(Fernando Pessoa: Autopsychography)

 

This exhibition about globalization shows five artists who are all strangers, not just to the art scene in Malmö, but in fact also to themselves.

On Malmö Gallerinatten the video publication Stella and Florence’s Syndrome was launched. Stella and Florence’s Syndrome is created by the artists running the exhibition place YEARS and it’s been shot on site during the exhibition.


Distinguished from the melee of user comments and structurally misogynist chat rooms harbouring rapid-fire trolls is the first of two exhibitions curated by Mikkel Carl. Together, they mark the transition of the Swedish publishing house Woodpecker Projects – in recent years they has published a number of hybrids between literature and visual art – now turning into more of an actual exhibition platform.

 

Accompanying the exhibition Woodpecker Projects publishes Untitled (hot pink), 2013; a work by Saskia Te Nicklin in which she has isolated and reprinted, using the exact same layout, all the words for colours in David Batchelor’s book Cromophobia.


This solo exhibition by Kevin Malcolm presents works from an ongoing artistic research project initiated in 2014. Its starting point is the Musée Guimet in Paris and the collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Émile Étienne Guimet whose fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

 

Driven by an interest in how images, texts and objects communicate meaning, Malcolm uses alteration, recombination and repositioning to highlight residual histories and power dynamics.


This show by Kevin Malcolm takes its starting point at the Musée Guimet in Paris and it’s collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Emile Guimet. His fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

Not only describing the colour, Outremer (Ultramarine) translates directly from French as overseas and was the name given to colonial territories and to military service performed there.

 

In these works the role of the artist as collector and exhibitor of images and objects in a digital era is questioned and parallels are made with 19th Century traditions of collecting.


AND AGAIN SHIFTS / OCH IGEN SKIFTEN is an exhibition and a part of Sandström’s research project Howe Across Reading – Performing the Past - an artistic research project, within the field of literary composition.

 

It is an investigation into the histories and languages of New England in the north east of USA and Västerbotten in the north of Sweden, with and through 
the writings of poet and literary scholar Susan Howe.

 

The project looks at, and listens to, how sounds, times and spaces are generated in ongoing translation
and trans-historical reading and writing across geographies, religions, and literatures. Howe’s texts are here a condition for searching, a means to navigate within archives, narratives, language based time-space.


Swedish premiere of the film We will meet in the blind spot by Maj Hasager (DK), and launch of her publication Making Visible published by Woodpecker Projects.

 

Release of Bifurcating futures, performance with dancer Maria Concetta Borgese (IT) and vinyl record release of Bifurcating Soundscape by composer Ask Kæreby (DK).

 

 


With Furåker’s exhibition A Poet in Need of an Empire at Ping Pong Gallery, Malmö, as a starting point, we invited Maj Hasager, Oscar K, Henrik Arnstad and the exhibiting artist Johan Furåker to write a letter each to someone from someone relating to the overall thematics. Also, we are publishing two essays by Lisbeth Bonde and Göran Hägg, respectively, who are presenting Gabriele D’Annunzio in closer detail.


Distinguished from the melee of user comments and structurally misogynist chat rooms harbouring rapid-fire trolls is the first of two exhibitions curated by Mikkel Carl. Together, they mark the transition of the Swedish publishing house Woodpecker Projects – in recent years they has published a number of hybrids between literature and visual art – now turning into more of an actual exhibition platform.

 

Accompanying the exhibition Woodpecker Projects publishes Untitled (hot pink), 2013; a work by Saskia Te Nicklin in which she has isolated and reprinted, using the exact same layout, all the words for colours in David Batchelor’s book Cromophobia.


The Encounter of Bodies is a show alongside a published fictive script by Stine Marie Jacobsen written in reference to the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, where a main character pretends to be mentally ill and lets himself be admitted to a mental hospital. Upon arriving, the character finds the ward run by a strict nurse, who instead of helping the patients in their recovery actually suppresses their mental health.

 

 

Similarly, in this script, the artworks of the show are in group therapy sessions led by the strict curators of Woodpecker Projects. We follow their discussions and self-explanations in a “behind the scene” set at Ystad Art Museum. In this show we are testing and unfolding ideas of power relations and hierarchical positions using body and language within and between the artworks.

 

 

Oftentimes we see artworks curbed to fit into curators’ manifests – precisely like patients in a ward run by a strict nurse who ignores details and sensitivities. We are testing the idea of the art show in relation to hierarchy, branding and the quest for curator fame. Still, under this mask we still believe society is crazy and that art is the voice of sanity!


The represented artists in the exhibition TERRA INCOGNITA at KRETS, work with different concepts and materials. Some works are documenting, some are romanticizing and others deceive the viewer’s eye. Some materials are refined and others raw.

 

The works are results of different processes, somehow dealing with nature. Some use the idea of nature, exploring it in contrast to a civilized, cultured world. Others are more direct confrontations. With these works, we hope to share and explore questions dealing with our (the contemporary human’s) relation to nature and its expressions.

 

TERRA INCOGNITA, the title of our book and of the exhibition, is a term used in cartography for regions that have not yet been mapped or documented. It is also the title of Jens Henricson’s contribution to the exhibition, which depicts a kidney cancer cell magnified 180 times. The artwork is reminiscent of how similar the microscopic sometimes is to the macroscopic. Henricson’s work is also the cover of our book.


In light of the current situation where an increasingly heated political climate is shaping the rhetoric and discussion concerning migrants and refugees – we wish to investigate the agency of art and artists working with these matters or within related fields.

 

The symposium is organized by Woodpecker Projects and artist Maj Hasager in collaboration with IAC, Malmö and Malmö Konstmuseum.


We Hate In Order to Survive is an exhibition that, on the one hand, shows the nature of hatred; it’s emotions, it’s propaganda and its logic. On the other hand, tries to understand the underlying reasons for it. Wherein lies the fascination of a homogeneous nation; the need to abolish the pluralistic society?

 

Is it possible to explain exclusion and hostility, and how it arises, from an artistic perspective? And secondly, is it possible to reach a plan of action and actually change the world through art? How do artists think and work with these questions?

 

(Artworks above by Runo Lagomarsino and Viktor Rosdahl)


The poet is a faker

Who’s so good at his act

He even fakes the pain

Of pain he feels in fact

 

(Fernando Pessoa: Autopsychography)

 

This exhibition about globalization shows five artists who are all strangers, not just to the art scene in Malmö, but in fact also to themselves.

On Malmö Gallerinatten the video publication Stella and Florence’s Syndrome was launched. Stella and Florence’s Syndrome is created by the artists running the exhibition place YEARS and it’s been shot on site during the exhibition.


This solo exhibition by Kevin Malcolm presents works from an ongoing artistic research project initiated in 2014. Its starting point is the Musée Guimet in Paris and the collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Émile Étienne Guimet whose fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

 

Driven by an interest in how images, texts and objects communicate meaning, Malcolm uses alteration, recombination and repositioning to highlight residual histories and power dynamics.


The represented artists in the exhibition TERRA INCOGNITA at KRETS, work with different concepts and materials. Some works are documenting, some are romanticizing and others deceive the viewer’s eye. Some materials are refined and others raw.

 

The works are results of different processes, somehow dealing with nature. Some use the idea of nature, exploring it in contrast to a civilized, cultured world. Others are more direct confrontations. With these works, we hope to share and explore questions dealing with our (the contemporary human’s) relation to nature and its expressions.

 

TERRA INCOGNITA, the title of our book and of the exhibition, is a term used in cartography for regions that have not yet been mapped or documented. It is also the title of Jens Henricson’s contribution to the exhibition, which depicts a kidney cancer cell magnified 180 times. The artwork is reminiscent of how similar the microscopic sometimes is to the macroscopic. Henricson’s work is also the cover of our book.


Swedish premiere of the film We will meet in the blind spot by Maj Hasager (DK), and launch of her publication Making Visible published by Woodpecker Projects.

 

Release of Bifurcating futures, performance with dancer Maria Concetta Borgese (IT) and vinyl record release of Bifurcating Soundscape by composer Ask Kæreby (DK).

 

 


The poet is a faker

Who’s so good at his act

He even fakes the pain

Of pain he feels in fact

 

(Fernando Pessoa: Autopsychography)

 

This exhibition about globalization shows five artists who are all strangers, not just to the art scene in Malmö, but in fact also to themselves.

On Malmö Gallerinatten the video publication Stella and Florence’s Syndrome was launched. Stella and Florence’s Syndrome is created by the artists running the exhibition place YEARS and it’s been shot on site during the exhibition.


The Encounter of Bodies is a show alongside a published fictive script by Stine Marie Jacobsen written in reference to the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, where a main character pretends to be mentally ill and lets himself be admitted to a mental hospital. Upon arriving, the character finds the ward run by a strict nurse, who instead of helping the patients in their recovery actually suppresses their mental health.

 

 

Similarly, in this script, the artworks of the show are in group therapy sessions led by the strict curators of Woodpecker Projects. We follow their discussions and self-explanations in a “behind the scene” set at Ystad Art Museum. In this show we are testing and unfolding ideas of power relations and hierarchical positions using body and language within and between the artworks.

 

 

Oftentimes we see artworks curbed to fit into curators’ manifests – precisely like patients in a ward run by a strict nurse who ignores details and sensitivities. We are testing the idea of the art show in relation to hierarchy, branding and the quest for curator fame. Still, under this mask we still believe society is crazy and that art is the voice of sanity!


AND AGAIN SHIFTS / OCH IGEN SKIFTEN is an exhibition and a part of Sandström’s research project Howe Across Reading – Performing the Past - an artistic research project, within the field of literary composition.

 

It is an investigation into the histories and languages of New England in the north east of USA and Västerbotten in the north of Sweden, with and through 
the writings of poet and literary scholar Susan Howe.

 

The project looks at, and listens to, how sounds, times and spaces are generated in ongoing translation
and trans-historical reading and writing across geographies, religions, and literatures. Howe’s texts are here a condition for searching, a means to navigate within archives, narratives, language based time-space.


We Hate In Order to Survive is an exhibition that, on the one hand, shows the nature of hatred; it’s emotions, it’s propaganda and its logic. On the other hand, tries to understand the underlying reasons for it. Wherein lies the fascination of a homogeneous nation; the need to abolish the pluralistic society?

 

Is it possible to explain exclusion and hostility, and how it arises, from an artistic perspective? And secondly, is it possible to reach a plan of action and actually change the world through art? How do artists think and work with these questions?

 

(Artworks above by Runo Lagomarsino and Viktor Rosdahl)


Distinguished from the melee of user comments and structurally misogynist chat rooms harbouring rapid-fire trolls is the first of two exhibitions curated by Mikkel Carl. Together, they mark the transition of the Swedish publishing house Woodpecker Projects – in recent years they has published a number of hybrids between literature and visual art – now turning into more of an actual exhibition platform.

 

Accompanying the exhibition Woodpecker Projects publishes Untitled (hot pink), 2013; a work by Saskia Te Nicklin in which she has isolated and reprinted, using the exact same layout, all the words for colours in David Batchelor’s book Cromophobia.


This show by Kevin Malcolm takes its starting point at the Musée Guimet in Paris and it’s collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Emile Guimet. His fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

Not only describing the colour, Outremer (Ultramarine) translates directly from French as overseas and was the name given to colonial territories and to military service performed there.

 

In these works the role of the artist as collector and exhibitor of images and objects in a digital era is questioned and parallels are made with 19th Century traditions of collecting.


In light of the current situation where an increasingly heated political climate is shaping the rhetoric and discussion concerning migrants and refugees – we wish to investigate the agency of art and artists working with these matters or within related fields.

 

The symposium is organized by Woodpecker Projects and artist Maj Hasager in collaboration with IAC, Malmö and Malmö Konstmuseum.


With Furåker’s exhibition A Poet in Need of an Empire at Ping Pong Gallery, Malmö, as a starting point, we invited Maj Hasager, Oscar K, Henrik Arnstad and the exhibiting artist Johan Furåker to write a letter each to someone from someone relating to the overall thematics. Also, we are publishing two essays by Lisbeth Bonde and Göran Hägg, respectively, who are presenting Gabriele D’Annunzio in closer detail.


This solo exhibition by Kevin Malcolm presents works from an ongoing artistic research project initiated in 2014. Its starting point is the Musée Guimet in Paris and the collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Émile Étienne Guimet whose fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

 

Driven by an interest in how images, texts and objects communicate meaning, Malcolm uses alteration, recombination and repositioning to highlight residual histories and power dynamics.


AND AGAIN SHIFTS / OCH IGEN SKIFTEN is an exhibition and a part of Sandström’s research project Howe Across Reading – Performing the Past - an artistic research project, within the field of literary composition.

 

It is an investigation into the histories and languages of New England in the north east of USA and Västerbotten in the north of Sweden, with and through 
the writings of poet and literary scholar Susan Howe.

 

The project looks at, and listens to, how sounds, times and spaces are generated in ongoing translation
and trans-historical reading and writing across geographies, religions, and literatures. Howe’s texts are here a condition for searching, a means to navigate within archives, narratives, language based time-space.


With Furåker’s exhibition A Poet in Need of an Empire at Ping Pong Gallery, Malmö, as a starting point, we invited Maj Hasager, Oscar K, Henrik Arnstad and the exhibiting artist Johan Furåker to write a letter each to someone from someone relating to the overall thematics. Also, we are publishing two essays by Lisbeth Bonde and Göran Hägg, respectively, who are presenting Gabriele D’Annunzio in closer detail.


The Encounter of Bodies is a show alongside a published fictive script by Stine Marie Jacobsen written in reference to the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, where a main character pretends to be mentally ill and lets himself be admitted to a mental hospital. Upon arriving, the character finds the ward run by a strict nurse, who instead of helping the patients in their recovery actually suppresses their mental health.

 

 

Similarly, in this script, the artworks of the show are in group therapy sessions led by the strict curators of Woodpecker Projects. We follow their discussions and self-explanations in a “behind the scene” set at Ystad Art Museum. In this show we are testing and unfolding ideas of power relations and hierarchical positions using body and language within and between the artworks.

 

 

Oftentimes we see artworks curbed to fit into curators’ manifests – precisely like patients in a ward run by a strict nurse who ignores details and sensitivities. We are testing the idea of the art show in relation to hierarchy, branding and the quest for curator fame. Still, under this mask we still believe society is crazy and that art is the voice of sanity!


In light of the current situation where an increasingly heated political climate is shaping the rhetoric and discussion concerning migrants and refugees – we wish to investigate the agency of art and artists working with these matters or within related fields.

 

The symposium is organized by Woodpecker Projects and artist Maj Hasager in collaboration with IAC, Malmö and Malmö Konstmuseum.


The poet is a faker

Who’s so good at his act

He even fakes the pain

Of pain he feels in fact

 

(Fernando Pessoa: Autopsychography)

 

This exhibition about globalization shows five artists who are all strangers, not just to the art scene in Malmö, but in fact also to themselves.

On Malmö Gallerinatten the video publication Stella and Florence’s Syndrome was launched. Stella and Florence’s Syndrome is created by the artists running the exhibition place YEARS and it’s been shot on site during the exhibition.


This show by Kevin Malcolm takes its starting point at the Musée Guimet in Paris and it’s collection of Asian art amassed by industrialist and traveller Emile Guimet. His fortune was made in the production of a synthetic ultramarine pigment essential as a whitening agent.

 

Not only describing the colour, Outremer (Ultramarine) translates directly from French as overseas and was the name given to colonial territories and to military service performed there.

 

In these works the role of the artist as collector and exhibitor of images and objects in a digital era is questioned and parallels are made with 19th Century traditions of collecting.


Swedish premiere of the film We will meet in the blind spot by Maj Hasager (DK), and launch of her publication Making Visible published by Woodpecker Projects.

 

Release of Bifurcating futures, performance with dancer Maria Concetta Borgese (IT) and vinyl record release of Bifurcating Soundscape by composer Ask Kæreby (DK).

 

 


Distinguished from the melee of user comments and structurally misogynist chat rooms harbouring rapid-fire trolls is the first of two exhibitions curated by Mikkel Carl. Together, they mark the transition of the Swedish publishing house Woodpecker Projects – in recent years they has published a number of hybrids between literature and visual art – now turning into more of an actual exhibition platform.

 

Accompanying the exhibition Woodpecker Projects publishes Untitled (hot pink), 2013; a work by Saskia Te Nicklin in which she has isolated and reprinted, using the exact same layout, all the words for colours in David Batchelor’s book Cromophobia.


The represented artists in the exhibition TERRA INCOGNITA at KRETS, work with different concepts and materials. Some works are documenting, some are romanticizing and others deceive the viewer’s eye. Some materials are refined and others raw.

 

The works are results of different processes, somehow dealing with nature. Some use the idea of nature, exploring it in contrast to a civilized, cultured world. Others are more direct confrontations. With these works, we hope to share and explore questions dealing with our (the contemporary human’s) relation to nature and its expressions.

 

TERRA INCOGNITA, the title of our book and of the exhibition, is a term used in cartography for regions that have not yet been mapped or documented. It is also the title of Jens Henricson’s contribution to the exhibition, which depicts a kidney cancer cell magnified 180 times. The artwork is reminiscent of how similar the microscopic sometimes is to the macroscopic. Henricson’s work is also the cover of our book.


We Hate In Order to Survive is an exhibition that, on the one hand, shows the nature of hatred; it’s emotions, it’s propaganda and its logic. On the other hand, tries to understand the underlying reasons for it. Wherein lies the fascination of a homogeneous nation; the need to abolish the pluralistic society?

 

Is it possible to explain exclusion and hostility, and how it arises, from an artistic perspective? And secondly, is it possible to reach a plan of action and actually change the world through art? How do artists think and work with these questions?

 

(Artworks above by Runo Lagomarsino and Viktor Rosdahl)